ebr12 reVIEWs of general interest
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Hannah Higgins proposes that writing about Duchamp needs to be Duchampian in flavor. Gene Kannenberg, Jr. finds David Boring technically accomplished, challenging as narrative but finally all too true to its title. Steffen Hantke on Tom LeClair's and Richard Powers's novelistic imaginations of terror. Sue Im-Lee reviews Reciting America by Christopher Douglas. Claire Rasmussen on geography and the social theory of Janet L. Abu-Lughod, Mike Davis, and Edward Soja. Lance Olsen reviews hypertext writing, past and present, by Robert Arellano. Jaishree K. Odin on the hyperfiction of M.D. Coverley.



ebr12 reVIEWs on critical ecologies:
media/systems theory

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Linda Brigham works through Embodying Technesis by Mark Hansen. Linda Carroli reviews Michael Joyce on networked culture, whose emergence changes our ideas of change. Joseph Tabbi reviews the essay collection Simulacrum America.



ebr11 reVIEWs
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Linda Brigham sees Zygmunt Bauman's Globalization: The Human Consequences, as a provocative introduction to our current environmental and economic predicament. Geoffrey Winthrop-Young takes the outside perspective on German media studies. In After the Post and The Postal System and the Making of German Literary Culture, a historian and a literary critic review Bernard Siegert's Relays: Literature as an Epoch of the Postal System. Jan Baetens finds that Carrie Noland's Poetry at Stake: Lyric Aesthetics and the Challenge of Technology provides a way out of the sterile opposition between literary and cultural studies. William Gillespie reads Bernstein's two anthologies, My Way and Republics of Reality, and makes forays into POETICS and the (mean)ing of poets and poetry.





ebr10 reVIEWs of general interest
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Jan Baetens reviews the Raymond Federman Recyclopedia, a book whose humour - and evident bad taste - raise it above its own formidable constraints; Thomas Hartl reviews Ron Sukenick's Mosaic Man; Cynthia Davidson reviews Sex for the Millennium by Harold Jaffe; Linda Brigham breaks the first rule of Fight Club and talks about what the movie industry keeps secret - not male masochism, anti-corporate terrorism, self-help, or even heterosexual anxiety, but how best to deliver a commodity that doesn't act like one; Timothy Melley reviews Mark Fenster on conspiracies in fact and fiction and finds evidence against the assumption that only nonexistent conspiracies produce conspiracy theories; William O'Rourke on the beat of the Clinton beat.





ebr10 reVIEWs on critical ecologies:
media theory and hypertext

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Bruce Clarke reviews the new translation of Grammophone, Film, Typewriter, a requiem and good-riddance for the era of "so-called Man"; Joseph Tabbi identifies a shift in U.S. criticism that has taken place in the eight years separating Susan Strehle's Fiction in the Quantum Universe and John Johnston's Information Multiplicity; Shirin Shenassa situates Roman de la Campa's Latin Americanism within the critical discourses of the world's metropolitan centers and introduces a new thREAD into ebr's Internet Nation series; Jan van Looy reviews Silvio Gaggi on hypertext fiction up to the early '90s; Luc Herman reviews the collection, Cyberspace Textuality.





ebr9 reVIEWs of general interest
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Matt Kirschenbaum reviews Remediations by Richard Grusin and Jay David Bolter; Linda Brigham reads How We Became Posthuman the way Katherine Hayles reads novels: as a story that resists both linearity and the analytical ardor of attempts at humanist ordering; David Zauhar reads Marjorie Perloff the way she reads poetry and philosophy: as ways of doing, rather than saying; Luca Di Blasi reads Peter Sloterdijk straight; Steve Tomasula reviews a series of publications by and about writer-critic Curtis White; Walton Muyumba reviews Randall Kenan's massive meditation on race and introduces a new word into the discourse on African American literature: zugenruhe; Tony D'Souza on Alex Shakar's Metamorphoses.





ebr9 reVIEWs on the literature of constraints
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Paul Harris rediscovers the senior American member of Oulipo on the occasion of three new reprints from The Dalkey Archive Press; Alain Vuillemin comprehends the compendium - a summing up of four decades of Oulipian activity; Phillippe Bootz gives an account of the longest standing web-based literary journal in France.





ebr8 reVIEWs on east/euro/pomo
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Svetozar Postic, on why his contemporaries in Serbia don't write like Hemingway.





ebr8 reVIEWs of general interest
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Geoffrey Winthrop-Young gets inside De Landa's total history; Elizabeth Jane Wall Hinds follows the narrative line of Pynchon's Mason & Dixon as it bifurcates and spreads over the globe and across two centuries; Stacey Levine on the occasion of Dalkey Archive's reprinting of The Age of Wire and String and publication of a new work by Marcus, Notable American Women; Nikki Dillon reviews No Lease on Life; Walton Muyumba on Scott DeVeaux, Ingrid Monson, and the writing of jazz history; Harold Fromm reviews three new books of eco-criticism; Douglas Nufer on big business's buy-out of history and the corporate biography's elevation to an art-form untroubled by irony. retroREview: John Matthias reflects on Humphrey Carpenter's Biography of 1988, in light of recent findings.





ebr7 reVIEWs on image+narrative
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Christine Bucher, reviewing Beatriz Columnina, considers the narrative and photographic dimensions of interiors designed by Adolf Loos and Le Corbusier; H. Kassia Fleisher watches TV and reads Campaign '96: The View from the Couch by William O'Rourke; Jon Wagner, Tracy Biga McLean, and Chris Peters look at how an avant-garde classic writes its opposite in La Jetée ciné-roman by Chris Marker and Bruce Mau; Steve Tomasula begins a non-inclusive roundup of some word-image publications of note; Andrew Blauvelt juxtaposes the corporate history Thinkbook and Rem Koolhass's S, M, L, XL; Raine Koskimaa reviews Michael Joyce's hyper-novel, Twilight: A Symphony.





ebr7 reVIEWs of general interest
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Steffen Hantke presents an archeology of DeLillo's Underworld; Chris Messenger reviews Tom LeClair's Passing Off; Anthony Miller interrogates Gilbert Sorrentino's metafictions; David Buuck decodes Dodie Bellamy's missives from beyond the grave; Michael Wutz maps the cultural coordinates of William Everdell's First Moderns; Hilmar Schmundt reconsiders the life and art of the first 'new journalist,' Egon Kisch; Linda Brigham gets outside Cary Wolfe's systems; Matthew Fuller considers the door as a media and as trauma, the data dandy, electronic solitude, World War Two as an extended traffic accident, and other touchstones compiled by ADILKNO in The Media Archive; Ursula Heise reads Arno Schmidt's science fiction.





ebr6 reVIEWs on image+narrative
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Michelle Grabner reviews Roger Sabin's Adult Comics and Comics, Comix & Graphic Novel; Michael Barrett juxtaposes conferences of the anti-academy academy and the ultra-academy academy; Alex Shakar on Neon Lit's graphic staging of Paul Auster's City of Glass; Audrey Niffenegger reviews Chris Ware's Book of Jokes; Kymberly Taylor exercises the Norton Poetry Workshop CD-ROM.





ebr6 reVIEWs of general interest
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Joel Felix listens in at Postmodern Culture; Kassandra Fleischer considers what it's like to write like an (emeritus) woman; Phil Leggiere on Richard Kostelanetz's Million Word March; Lisa Orr on cultural studies; Christine Bucher on ecocriticism; Peter O'Leary on Strick: Song of the Andoumboulou 16-25.





ebr5 reVIEWs
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John Cayley reviews the Hypertext '97 conference in The King is Dead, Long Live the King; Chris Funkhouser reviews Charles Hartman's Virtual Muse and the New Media Poetry issue of Visible Language; Elisabeth Joyce reviews Susan Daitch's Storytown; Othello Blues is Tom LeClair's review of FictionNet by Harold Jaffe; Michael O'Leary reviews Ends of the Lyric by Timothy Bahti; Joseph Tabbi reviews Papers From the Warwick Conference in Pynchon Notes.





ebr4 reVIEWs
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Anne Burdick reads Jay David Bolter's Writing Space; Martha Henn reviews Technologies of the Gendered Body by Anne Balsamo; Marjorie Perloff reviews Franco Moretti's Modern Epic: The World-System from Goethe to Garcia Marquez; Piotr Siemion discusses Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace; Todd E. Napolitano Goes Gonzo; Michael Wutz on Bruce Clarke's Dora Marsden and Early Modernism: Gender, Individualism, Science.





ebr3 reVIEWs
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Joe Amato on the Social Text controversy; August Tarrier reviews Bare-Naked Ladies: The Bad Girls of the Postfeminist Nineties; Linda Brigham reviews the Spring and Fall 1995 issues of Cultural Critique; Matthew Fuller on The Cyborg Handbook; Greg Dyer steals glances at women('s) writing on the World Wide Web; De Witt Douglas Kilgore reviews Technoscience and Cyberculture; Christopher Knight on Stanley Fish's Professional Correctness; George Landow reviews Patchwork Girl by Shelley Jackson; Todd E. Napolitano on the Kitsch of On-Line Journals.





ebr2 reVIEWs
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In Academia, Inc., Linda Brigham reviews Incorporations, the most recent collection from Zone Books; David Cassuto reviews Wild Ideas, a collection of ecocritical essays; Matt Kirschenbaum on Richard Coyne's philosophical treatment of technographics; Daniel Riess on Roger Chartier's media history; an overview of Gregory Ulmer's thought by Victor Vitanza.





ebr1 reVIEWs
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Joseph Tabbi on media theory, book reviewing, Bruce Sterling's dead media project, and Richard Powers's Galatea 2.2; Mark Amerika on establishing Alternative-X in the no-man's land between commercial, academic, and underground media; N. Katherine Hayles discusses what happens when postmodern writers theorize in a void; liquid architect Marcos Novak on William Mitchell's City of Bits; Paul Harris explores IN.S.OMNIA's technographies; Linda Brigham imagines what a hypertext philosophy might be; Michael Joyce looks at experimental hypertext, body art, body piercing, and web culture; Peter Krapp riffs on the philosophy underlying his web site, foreign body; checks in on the Telematik Workgroup in Hamburg, Germany; Walter Vannini investigates the effects of hypertext publishing in Italy's literary marketplace.


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